Letairis® (ambrisentan) logo
For HCPs

Letairis (ambrisentan) is a prescription medicine used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), which is high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs.

Last updated: November 2017
Watch our Patient Ambassador, Michelle, discuss Traveling with PAH
Join More to My Story: a community for PAH patients

A community for PAH patients

Letairis More to My Story is an online resource with useful information to educate and support PAH patients. Designed for PAH patients and their loved ones, you’ll find information about Letairis treatment, recipes, exercise tips, inspiring patient stories, and more. You and your friends and family are invited to join us today.
Join our online community now to receive helpful information delivered to your email and gain access to a complete library of tips and tools

Welcome to

Sign up for the More to My Story Newsletter Newsletter


In this issue:

Ambassador’s Corner

Michelle, our More to My Story Ambassador, provides helpful ideas and tips for traveling with PAH

Spotlight
 

Here’s some great advice for staying active and healthy through the holidays and into the new year

Recipe Roundup

White chicken chili

If you’re not already registered with More to My Story, sign up now to receive email updates when new issues of the newsletter are available online.

What is Letairis?

Letairis is a prescription medicine used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), which is high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs.

  • Letairis can improve your ability to exercise and it can help slow down the worsening of your physical condition and symptoms
  • When taken with tadalafil, Letairis is used to reduce the risks of your disease progressing and hospitalization due to worsening PAH, and to improve your ability to exercise
 
Spotlight

Staying active through the holidays

As the seasons change and you begin planning for a new year, it’s the perfect time to establish some good habits that will see you through the winter months. Remember, before you take care of anything else, you must first take care of yourself. Staying active is important to both your mental and physical health, and a great way to help manage holiday stress.

Grab your sneakers and get moving with these tips. Be sure to check with your PAH Specialist before starting or changing your exercise routine.

  • Start slowly. Begin with a short walk. Add distance and time gradually as you build stamina. Consider taking a walking partner along with you for added inspiration. Consistency is key—even if just around the block, make a habit of taking a walk regularly.
  • Try yoga. It’s gentle on your body and calming to your mind. Try a DVD at home or look for local classes. Yoga is focused on breathing, so it can be especially helpful for those with PAH to learn to slow and control their breath. Many yoga studios offer gentle classes designed for beginners and those with chronic pain or illness. Start slowly and be sure to talk to your instructor about any challenges you may have.
  • Avoid activity in extreme temperatures. Generally, cold, heat, humidity, or high elevation can make it harder to exercise. You should be extra careful when exercising in these conditions. Consider walking indoors in a shopping mall or walk the perimeter of your favorite store. Find a group class at your local YMCA, gym, or recreation center. Some hospitals offer exercise programs for people who want to stay active but who may have health challenges.
  • Find your motivation. Are you focused on building or maintaining strength to keep up with a child or grandchild, preparing for a special event or trip, or just want to improve your stamina? Whatever it is, write it down. Tape it to your refrigerator or bathroom mirror to remind yourself to keep moving.
  • Listen to your body. While it’s important to set goals and gradually increase your activity, don’t push yourself. Try yoga, stretching, or another gentle activity. You might even turn on some music and dance. Even if you fall out of your routine occasionally, get back into a regular exercise habit as soon as you can.

Always check with your PAH Specialist before starting any exercise program.

 




“When it’s warm outside I try walking on the greenway. My neighbors come out, I talk to them.”
Speak out

Are you planning to make an insurance change for the next year?


A lot of people make changes in insurance at this time of year. We’d like to know your plans.

 


Thanks for your response!

Be sure to check the next issue of the More to My Story newsletter for survey results.

Have questions about insurance coverage for Letairis? We’re here to help. Call your LEAP Case Specialist at 1-866-664-5327.

In our last issue, we asked about some of your favorite summer foods. Whether it’s corn on the cob, homegrown tomatoes, or ice cream, it’s clear we all enjoy summer’s bounty. Thanks for sharing your favorites with us!


Recipe Roundup

White chicken chili recipe

Ingredients

4 Servings

  • non-stick cooking spray
  • 1 lb boneless skinless chicken breasts or tenderloins (all visible fat discarded) OR
  • 1 lb ground white meat chicken or turkey
  • 1 medium onion (finely chopped)
  • 1 medium bell pepper (chopped)
  • 3 cloves garlic (minced) OR
  • 1 tsp jarred minced garlic
  • 2 cups fat-free, low-sodium chicken broth OR
  • 1 16-oz can fat-free, low-sodium chicken broth
  • 2 15.5-oz cans no-salt-added or low-sodium beans (mix or match pinto, red, kidney, or navy), drained, rinsed
  • 1/2 tsp pepper
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp chili powder (optional)
  • jalapeño (optional if you like spicy chili)
  • fresh cilantro (optional)
  • 1/2 cup low-fat or fat-free sour cream (optional)
 
Recipe
Roundup

White Chicken Chili*

Who doesn’t love a hearty bowl of chili? Unfortunately, unless you choose low-sodium, chili made with canned beans can be loaded with sodium. PAH Specialists recommend that people with PAH limit sodium. Try this delicious spin on the old classic. For more information on PAH and sodium, visit http://www.phassociation.org/SaltAndSodium.

Directions

Remove visible fat from chicken, cut into bite-sized pieces. Spray large pot with cooking spray. Add chicken, onion, garlic, chili powder (optional), and jalapeño (optional), cooking over medium-heat until chicken is no longer pink (about 7 minutes).

Lightly mash the drained, rinsed beans with a fork.

Add all remaining ingredients to chicken mixture and simmer on high for 10 minutes.

Spoon chili into bowls and top with chopped fresh cilantro and/or dollop of sour cream (optional).

344 calories per serving
0.5 g saturated fat per serving
174 mg sodium per serving

*Recipe copyright ©2016 American Heart Association. This recipe is brought to you by the American Heart Association’s Simple Cooking with Heart® Program. For more simple, quick, and affordable recipes, visit heart.org/simplecooking.

©2017 Gilead Sciences, Inc. All rights reserved. LETC0301 11/17

Letairis and the Letairis logo, Gilead and the Gilead logo, More to My Story and the More to My Story logo, are registered trademarks of Gilead Sciences, Inc., or its related companies. Other brands noted herein are the property of their respective owners.

Learn more about Letairis + tadalafil combination therapy

Is Letairis right for you?


Letairis + tadalafil may help improve your ability to exercise, reduce the risk of your PAH getting worse, and reduce your risk of hospitalizations due to PAH. Get more details about Letairis.


Letairis discussion guide to start the conversation with your doctor

Ready to talk to your doctor about Letairis?

Find out if Letairis may be appropriate for you. Use this Doctor Discussion Guide to start the conversation with your PAH Specialist.

Love the newsletter?

Get more articles just like these.

Get access to our library for more exercise tips, delicious low-sodium recipes, support information, wellness ideas, and patient stories. All created with PAH patients like you in mind.

Important Safety Information
and Indication

What is the most important information I should know about Letairis?

Letairis can cause serious birth defects if taken during pregnancy.

  • Females must not be pregnant when they start taking Letairis or become pregnant while taking Letairis
  • Females who are able to get pregnant must have a negative pregnancy test before starting Letairis, every month while taking Letairis, and 1 month after stopping Letairis. Your doctor will decide when to do the tests, and order the tests for you depending on your menstrual cycle
    • Females who are able to get pregnant are females who have entered puberty (even if they have not started their period), and have a uterus, and have not gone through menopause (menopause means that you have not had a period for at least 12 months for natural reasons, or that you have had your ovaries removed)

Females who are able to get pregnant must use two acceptable forms of birth control while taking Letairis and for 1 month after stopping Letairis because the medicine may still be in the body. See the Letairis Medication Guide for acceptable birth control options.

  • If you have had a tubal sterilization or have an IUD (intrauterine device) or progesterone implant, these methods can be used alone and no other form of birth control is needed
  • Talk with your doctor to find out about options for acceptable forms of birth control that you may use to prevent pregnancy during treatment with Letairis
  • If you decide that you want to change the form of birth control, talk with your doctor to be sure that you choose another acceptable form of birth control
  • Do not have unprotected sex. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist right away if you have unprotected sex or if you think your birth control has failed. Your doctor may tell you to use emergency birth control
  • Tell your doctor right away if you miss a menstrual period or think you may be pregnant

If you are the parent or caregiver of a female child who started taking Letairis before reaching puberty, you should check your child regularly to see if she is developing signs of puberty. Tell your doctor right away if you notice that she is developing breast buds or any pubic hair. Your child may reach puberty before having her first menstrual period.

Females can only receive Letairis through a restricted program called the Letairis Risk Evaluation and Mitigation (REMS) program. If you are a female who can get pregnant, you must talk to your doctor, understand the benefits and risks of Letairis, and agree to all of the instructions in the Letairis REMS program.

Who should not take Letairis?

Do not take Letairis if:

  • You are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or become pregnant while taking Letairis. Letairis can cause serious birth defects. (See "What is the most important information I should know about Letairis?")
  • You have Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF)

What should I avoid while taking Letairis?

  • Do not get pregnant. If you miss a menstrual period, or think you might be pregnant, call your doctor right away
  • Do not breastfeed. It is not known if Letairis passes into your breast milk

What are the other possible side effects of Letairis?

Serious side effects of Letairis can include:

  • Swelling all over the body (fluid retention) can happen within weeks after starting Letairis. Tell your doctor right away if you have any unusual weight gain, tiredness, or trouble breathing while taking Letairis. These may be symptoms of a serious health problem. You may need to be treated with medicine or need to go to the hospital
  • Decreased sperm counts have happened in some men taking a medicine that is like Letairis, which may affect your ability to father a child. Tell your doctor if being able to have children is important to you
  • Low red blood cell levels (anemia) can happen during the first weeks after starting Letairis. If this happens, you may need a blood transfusion. Your doctor will do blood tests to check your red blood cells before starting Letairis. Your doctor may also do these tests while you are taking Letairis

The most common side effects of Letairis are swelling of hands, legs, ankles and feet (peripheral edema), stuffy nose (nasal congestion), inflamed nasal passages (sinusitis), hot flashes or getting red in the face (flushing). Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or does not go away.

The most common side effects of Letairis when taken with tadalafil are swelling of hands, legs, ankles and feet (peripheral edema), headache, stuffy nose (nasal congestion), cough, low red blood cell levels (anemia), indigestion (dyspepsia) or upper respiratory tract infection (bronchitis).

Some medicines that are like Letairis can cause liver problems. Tell your doctor if you get any of these symptoms while taking Letairis: loss of appetite, nausea or vomiting, fever, achiness, generally do not feel well, pain in the upper right stomach (abdominal) area, yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes, dark urine, itching.

What should I tell my doctor before taking Letairis?

  • All your medical conditions. Be sure to tell your doctor if you have a low red blood cell level (anemia) or liver problems
  • All the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins and herbal supplements. Letairis and other medicines may affect each other, causing side effects. Do not start any new medicines until you check with your doctor
  • Especially tell your doctor if you take cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune). Your doctor may need to change your dose of Letairis

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is Letairis?

Letairis is a prescription medicine used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), which is high blood pressure in the arteries of the lungs.

  • Letairis can improve your ability to exercise and it can help slow down the worsening of your physical condition and symptoms
  • When taken with tadalafil, Letairis is used to reduce the risks of your disease progressing and hospitalization due to worsening PAH, and to improve your ability to exercise

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide, with important warnings.